The Risk Management Tool Box Blog

Common Safety Training Program for Experienced Workers

Graham Marshall - Sunday, September 30, 2012

The APPEA industry forum on Tuesday 14th August 2012 identified that experienced workers (those with more than one year's industry experience) can have their Recognized Prior Learning ("RPL") status confirmed within the Common Safety Training Program (CSTP) if they have previously completed the Hazard and Risk Management Training Program offered by the Risk Tool Box.

According to the CSTP Independent Reviewer, the Risk Tool Box training program meets the Recognized Prior Learning status for the CSTP module "Identify Hazards and Assess Risk".

The confirmation of our RPL status by APPEA and the CSTP means that company's with offshore workers could save themselves thousands of dollars in future additional training costs.

That is because the Risk Tool Box training program already addresses the Step-back, Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) and Qualitative Risk Assessment RPL requirements within the CSTP framework.

The confirmation of RPL status for our training course is applicable to more than 10,000 employees and contractors who have completed our Stepback and JHA training. 

HSE Managers and/or Training Managers in the following company's should now check their records for evidence of their workers attending our hazard awareness and JHA training:

+   TK Shipping;
 
+   BHP Billiton;

+   Hess;

+   Santos;

+   ENI;

+   Transfield Worley;+   Shell Development Australia;

+   Chevron;

+   Woodside; and

+   Other smaller contractors and suppliers who work in offshore production and/or drilling facilities.

We will also continue to assist any company with its Hazard Awareness, Stepback, JHA, Risk Assessment and HazOp Training requirements using our industry-leading program. 

And unlike certain other organizations that have come to WA from Aberdeen, NSW, or elsewhere to make some quick cash from our boom, we're a proudly Australian business with a WA-developed program from the start back in 1998!

Danger of Falling Scaffolding Tubes

Graham Marshall - Thursday, September 20, 2012

The dangers associated with not having, or not following proper procedures and not undertaking a "Stepback" using our unique Think 6, Look 6 hazard identification process are highlighted again by this safety alert from Woodside and APPEA.

The alert shows how a length of scaffolding tubing was allowed to fall between decks when procedures were not followed, supervision was not appropriate and Stepback was not being done.

Thankfully no one was harmed during this high-potential incident so luck was on the side of Woodside today.

Without a good use of Think 6, Look 6, they might not be so lucky next time.

Process Safety Management KPIs

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Process Hazard Management (PHM) addresses the requirements for managing the integrity of operating systems and processes handling hazardous substances.

It involves by applying the hierarchy of safety control into the design phase, front-end engineering, construction, operating and maintenances practices for any Major Hazard Facility.

The objective of Process Hazard Management is to reduce the potential for the release of hazardous materials or other forms of hazardous energy.

The loss of control of those hazards can result in fires, explosion, or dangerous loss of containment.

These incidents can in turn, result in catastrophic consequences with multiple fatalities, pollution and social disruption.

In Australia, the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority (NOPSEMA) has indicated that a number of recent inspections have shown that many operators do not have complete or comprehensive systems for monitoring process safety performance (The Regulator, 4, September, 2012).

Australian Regulations require that operators must have a "Safety Case" for their offshore facility which must demonstrate there are effective means of ensuring the safety of the operation.

The Safety Case should clearly articulate how the following PHM matters will be achieved:

1. The implementation of the HSE Management System;

2. Continual and systematic identification of deficiencies in the HSE-MS; and

3. Continual and systematic improvement of the safety management.

Implementation, identification of deficiencies and continual improvement (performance management) are integral to Process Hazard Management.

Ongoing performance monitoring, measurement and management is necessary to evaluate effective implementation, and continual and systematic identification of deficiencies in the HSE-MS.

Continuous and systematic improvement of safety management can be achieved by identifying and setting process hazard management performance objectives and KPIs.

For process hazards, the KPIs will primarily focus on the control measures that prevent the loss of containment of hydrocarbons that could result in a catastrophic incidents such as fires and explosions or loss of marine stability.

For any operator or facility, the chosen of KPIs should provide the required information to assist in meeting the planned objectives of Process Hazard Management.

KPI results should be shared within an organization and provide a basis for analysis, synthesis and ultimately decision making across all levels of the organization.

 

Woodside Pedestal Crane Failure

Graham Marshall - Thursday, September 13, 2012

Here is a safety alert from APPEA regarding a pedestal crane failure involving Woodside Energy in Australia. 

The safety alert highlights the need to perform preventative maintenace checks on all cranes at regular periods.

CSTP Confirms Recognized Prior Learning for Risk Tool Box

Graham Marshall - Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Alf Standen (Independent Reviewer) has confirmed to Dr Graham Marshall of the Risk Tool Box, that offshore workers who have attended the Hazard and Risk Management Training Program offered by the Risk Tool Box over recent years may have "recognized prior learning" (RPL) status within the the Common Safety Training Program (CSTP) module called "Identify Hazards and Assess Risk".

According to the confirmation by the CSTP Independent Reviewer, workers who have completed the Risk Tool Box training program addressing Step-back, Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) and Qualitative Risk  Assessment may meet the RPL requirements within the CSTP framework."  

The confirmation was made verbally in response to a question put to Alf Standan.  In all cases, Organizations and individuals wishing to learn the status of RPL, should contact either APPEA or the independant reviewer for further confirmation of thier status.

According to the confirmation by CSTP Independent Reviewer, workers who have completed the Risk Tool Box training program addressing Step-back, Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) and Qualitative Risk Assessment may meet the RPL requirements within the CSTP framework.

The confirmation of RPL status for our training course may be applicable to more than 10,000 employees and contractors who have completed our Stepback and JHA training. 

We suggest that HSE Managers and/or Training Managers in the following organizations check their training matrix records for evidence of their workers attending our hazard management program since 1998:

+   Shell Development Australia;

+   Chevron;

+   Woodside;

+   BHP Billiton;

+   TK Shipping;
 
+   ENI;

+   Transfield Worley;

+   Hess;

+   Santos; and

+   Other smaller contractors and suppliers who work offshore on the NW Shelf or further afield.

Of course, we will be also happy to continue to assist any organization with its Hazard and Risk Management Training requirements for Stepback, JHA or Risk Assessment using our World-class program.

Mullion Life Jacket Recall

Graham Marshall - Wednesday, September 05, 2012

The life jacket manufacturer Mullion has reported that there is a potential safety concern with the COMPACT 150N ISO 12402 LIFEJACKET.

Mullion has recalled all compact life-jackets which have been sold since 1st Dec 2011 if they have a YELLOW valve in the oral inflation tube.

Compact life-jackets that have a RED valve in the oral inflation tube are not subject to this recall.

The affected lifejackets are being recalled as a precaution for inspection and will either be repaired or replaced.

RPL for the Common Safety Training Program

Graham Marshall - Thursday, August 16, 2012

APPEA and the Common Safety Training Program (CSTP) Independent Reviewer have both confirmed that Australian energy sector workers who have attended the Hazard and Risk Management Training Program offered by the Risk Tool Box over recent years shall have "recognized prior learning" (RPL) status for the CSTP module called "Identify Hazards and Assess Risk".

The RPL element within the Risk Tool Box training program covers Step-back 5X5 and JHA or JSA as well as Qualitative Risk Assessment to allow for working safely within the CSTP framework.

APPEA's confirmation of RPL status for our program will apply to over ten-thousand workers who have attended our training course. 

Workers in the following organization's should check with their training or records keeping department for evidence of attending Risk Tool Box's industry leading training program since 1998:

+   Woodside Energy between (1998 and 2007);

+   BHP Petroleum (Griffin Venture);

+   Chevron (Barrow Island);
 
+   ENI Australia (2005 - 2011);

+   Hess Corporation (2008 - present);

+   Santos (2007 - present); and

+   A range of other small contractors and suppliers who work in the offshore oil and gas industry.

 

Lightning strike causes ship blast - 5 dead on Methanol Tanker

Graham Marshall - Thursday, August 09, 2012

The dangers posed by "natural hazards" such as lightning have been highlighted by a shipping disaster in Malaysia.

Five sea-farers are feared dead after Malaysian authorities found the bodies of two more crew members missing after the fiery explosion of a chemical tanker.

The catastrophic disaster unfolded last week as the Motor Vessel (MV) Bunga Alpinia was being loaded with Methanol on the island of Labuan.

The port of Labuan is in the South China Sea off the coast of the Sarawak in Borneo.

Although still investigating the cause of the fire, Local police have said they suspect a lightning strike triggered the four huge blasts aboard the ship.

The initial fire broke out during a thunderstorm as the ship was docked at a methanol terminal run by national energy firm Petronas.

The blasts aboard the chemical tanker triggered a raging inferno that took fire fighters 30 hours to bring under control.

The 38,000-ton ship suffered severe damage.

The accident forced the temporary evacuation of hundreds of factory workers at Labuan until the ship could be towed away from the loading dock and out to sea.

The tanker vessel had 29 people on board at the time of the disaster.  23 were Malaysian nationals and the remaining six were Filipinos.

Twenty-four of the crew were quickly rescued, but rescue boats were combing the area near the tanker for the remaining five crew members. Fire fighters have also boarded the smoldering vessel to search for survivors.

According to Malaysian media reports, the vessel is owned by shipping firm MISC, a subsidiary of Petronas.

Use of Sorbent Materials during Oil Spills

Graham Marshall - Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Sorbent materials provide a useful resource to oil spill managers to assist in recovering oil when other techniques are unsuitable.

But sorbents should be used sparingly because their use can create excessive amounts of waste.

This Technical Information paper provides an overview of the use of sorbent materials in oil spill response.

Management of Change Alert

Graham Marshall - Sunday, August 05, 2012

This safety alert (click here) from the Marine Safety Forum highlights the importance of managing any changes to equipment which may have significant safety impacts.

The alert shows how an incident with the potential to cause a fatality occurred on a cement storage pressure vessel when original-equipment securing dogs were replaced by simple nuts of the wrong size.

The change in original equipment was made to facilitate easier passage between the secure hatch cover and a support pillar; with the nuts being shorter than the securing dogs.

The incident occurred, however, when the vessel was pressurized and the nuts failed causing the hatch to fly open and the nuts to fly off.

Had anyone been present in the the area at the time of the pressure release, it is likely they would have been killed.

So the key message here is to always undertake a risk assessment for management of change whenever original equipment is being replaced for "not like for like".

 

 

 

 


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