The Risk Management Tool Box Blog

North East England Farm Safety Event

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Click here for information and sign-up to a free safety event aimed at farmers in the Northeast of England.


ATSB Hot Work Safety Video

Graham Marshall - Sunday, September 29, 2013

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is urging all maritime workers and boat owners to watch a short online safety video that features an accident involving a crew member on board a ship who was tragically killed by an explosion while cutting a used 200 litre drum with an angle grinder.

The ATSB has investigated several accidents involving "hot-work" cutting of used fuel drums in the marine industry.

In all cases, the  accidents could have been prevented if the workers had just given some time to think about the hazards involved and followed proper "hot-work" procedures.

The video provides a powerful reminder to all seafarers of the need to take make sure that hazards involved in "hot-work" are appropriately managed.

To view the video, click this link.

One Fatality Every Three Weeks in WA

Graham Marshall - Thursday, September 05, 2013
WorkSafe in Western Australia has reported on new figures which demonstrate that one West Australian worker dies every 21 days as a result of a work related accident

Statistics compiled between 2008 and 2013 showed 5,350 workers suffered very severe injuries in total, with at least one fatality occurring every three weeks.

At the Risk Tool Box, we know that all of those accidents could have been prevented if the hazards were correctly identified and managed. 

Effective hazard management is essential to your safety and the safety of those you work with. 

Do you know how to identify, assess, and control  workplace hazards?

As the Worksafe statistics clearly demonstrate, workplace accidents occur every day. 

But most accidents are  preventable, particularly when the correct hazard management process is used.

For many years now, the Risk Tool Box has been at the forefront of equiping workers with the knowledge and skills to apply the hazard management process to assist in managing risk and maintaining an injury-free workplace.

Our training courses are modular and aimed at any individual who may be exposed to hazards in their workplace.

On completion of our course, workers are able to:

1. Define the Hazard and Risk Management Process;

2. Identify hazards and assess triggering factors;

3. Understand incidents and the potential consequences which could occur when things go wrong;

4. Select and implement controls using the hierarchy of control;

5. Monitor and review controls, ensuring that emergency situations are quickly dealt with; and

6. Record the results of the hazard management process using hazard spotting or JSA.

For more information about our award winning program, call Dr Graham Marshall on 0408 472 678.

Danger to Young Workers During Holidays

Graham Marshall - Monday, August 05, 2013

According to the British Safety Council, young workers are at greatest risk of accidents at work during the first few months of a new job.

And with the summer holidays starting now, employers need to pay extra attention to the health and safety of young people hired for holiday work.

By taking some simple steps, the risk of injury to young workers can be easily reduced.

Good leadership is the key in preventing injury to  young people at the start of their working lives.

Organizations need to ensure that safe and healthy work practices are the rule; and that they have a culture that promotes and values safe behaviour.

The first step is to identify the hazards to young workers.

What are the hazards associated with lifting, working at height, using machinery, moving around the site, using chemicals, and such like.

Then using the knowledge of experienced staff, perform necessary risk assessments.

The risk assessments should help management to decide how best to control the hazards faced by young workers.

Reducing the risk profile of the business by adequate hazard management is crucial to achieve the vision that no young workers are injured or killed at work.

Pyrolosis in Truck Tyres

Graham Marshall - Friday, July 19, 2013

Coming into contact with overhead power lines when driving can cause the tyres on trucks, cranes and other heavy vehicles to catch fire and explode.

Five workers have been killed by exploding tyres in Australia in recent years and many more injured as excessive heat developing in tyres has led to the unpredictable phenomenon known as pyrolysis.

Pyrolysis can occur when excess heat is applied to a tyre.

Often it is a result of electrical arcing and current flow when rubber tyred vehicles have been involved in high voltage electrical incidents.

The heat decomposes the rubber and other compounds used to manufacture the tyre, creating a ready fuel source.

The ratio of this fuel to the air used to inflate the tyres can then reach flammable or LEL (explosive) levels.

The explosive energy released during a tyre explosion can lead to serious injuries or fatalities and significant equipment damage.

Because of the amount of kinetic energy released, a danger area up to 300 metres away is typically required to be established.

Pyrolysis related explosions are unpredictable, sometimes happening immediately, sometimes up to 24 hours after the heat was applied to the tyres.

And the explosion can happen with no visible signs of a fire on the outside of the tyre before it explodes.

Besides electrical heat sources, other sources of heat that lead to pyrolysis in tyres include welding (e.g., on wheel rims), oxy/acetylene heating wheel nuts, overheating brakes and wheel motor fires.

Tyre explosions predominantly occur with split rim configurations, but can happen with all types of tyres.

Any pneumatic rubber tyred vehicle involved in an incident where an electrical fault results in discharges or arcing around or through the tyres should be considered a potential hazard.

Procedures to follow when there is a danger of a tyre explosion, such as when a rubber tyred vehicle has contacted overhead power lines include:

+ Parking the vehicle in an isolation zone, with a minimum 300 metre radius;

+ Removing everyone from the area, and not allowing anyone to re-enter the isolation zone for 24 hours; and

+ Alerting fire fighting services to the potential hazard.

It should be noted that if pneumatic tyres are filled with nitrogen instead of air, it reduces, if not eliminates the risk of pyrolyic tyre explosion.

Kinetic Energy in Crane Wire Rope

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, May 28, 2013

The safety alert (below) produced by the Marine Safety Forum highlights how the stored kinetic energy hazard within wire-rope used in slings and rigging should be understood before working on changing out such types of wire-rope.

The alert also highlights the need for: 1) Document Procedure for the task; 2)  JSA to be completed highlighting the kinetic energy hazard; and 3) No one to stand in "line of fire" when removing spooled wire-rope.

Supervisors Role for HSE

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, April 30, 2013

It is a self-evident truth that Supervisors perform a vital role in the identification and control of hazards, and minimization of risk.

The supervisor's role is critical in showing "the public face" of the organisation; representing the organisation’s HSE values, HSE priorities and HSE expectations. 

And employees will typically  look to their supervisors’ actions to identify those behaviours and attitudes which are likely to be viewed favourably or otherwise by the organisation. 

As such, supervisor language and behaviour has a direct impact on employee HSE behaviour. 

From a risk management perspective, effective supervision requires time spent coaching employees in identifying, understanding and controlling hazards.

This approach to supervision not only educates employees in the how and why of hazard identification and management, but also demonstrates that it is the top priority for the organisation. 

Furthermore, direct feedback is one of the most effective tools that supervisors can use to improve employee HSE performance.

There are a broad variety of strategies that can and should be used to improve supervisor performance in promoting and reinforcing appropriate hazard management behaviour. 

From a personnel resourcing perspective, the following strategies may be beneficial:

   Maintain a low employee to supervisor ratio for teams where hazard management is a critical part of their function;

   Provide supervisors with training and coaching in understanding human error mechanisms and fatigue and time pressure issues. 

   Develop Procedures that support supervisors in implementing this knowledge;

   Encourage supervisors to provide feedback to planners in relation to actual vs. planned time for task completion, and build this feedback into future man-hour estimates;

   Provide supervisors with an opportunity to challenge or question plans and schedules; and

   Exercise caution when adding to the workload or responsibilities of supervisors. 

Research shows that, as their workload increases, supervisors spend less time engaged in one-on-one coaching with their employees. 

But this one-on-one coaching is precisely the most effective leadership tools used by supervisors, particularly in relation to promoting and encouraging hazard management behaviour.

UK Pressure Safety Regulations, 2000

Graham Marshall - Sunday, March 31, 2013

In the United Kingdom, the Pressure Systems Safety Regulations (2000) deal with the safe operation of a pressure system and the Pressure Equipment Regulations 1999 deal with the design, manufacture and supply of pressure systems.

The laws for pressure systems are comprehensive because many types of pressure equipment can be hazardous.

Pressurized equipment include steam boilers and associated pipework, pressurized hot-water boilers, air compressors, air receivers and associated pipework, autoclaves, gas (eg LPG) storage tanks and chemical reaction vessels.

If not properly controlled, pressurized equipment which fails can explode and cause serious injuries and lead to fatalities.

But putting proper controls in place will minimize the chances of any unwanted pressure releases occurring.

As with all safety management, the key to good control of pressurized equipment is to assess the risk associated with the specific equipment in the workplace and to use the hierarchy of control to develop the appropriate safeguards.

The risk associated with a the failure in pressurized  equipment depends on a number of factors including:

+  The operating pressure in the system;
 
+  The type of liquid or gas under pressure and its properties;

+  The suitability of the equipment and pipework that contains the pressure;

+  The age and condition of the equipment;

+  The complexity and control of its operation;

+  The other applicable conditions (e.g., operating temperature of equipment); and

+  The expertise of the people who maintain, test and operate the pressurized equipment.

To reduce the risk associated with pressurized systems, Managers need to know (and act on) some basic precautions:

+  Ensure the system can be operated safely;

+  Be careful when repairing or modifying a pressure system;

+  Following any major repair or modification, have the whole system re-examined before start-up;

+  Ensure there is a set of operating procedures for all of the equipment in the system, including in emergencies;

+  Ensure that there is a maintenance program for the system;

+  The maintenance program should account for the age, use and the environment in which the system is used.

In addition to those controls, a written scheme of examination is required for most pressure systems:

+  This should be certified as suitable by a competent person;

+  It should address all protective devices, every pressure vessel and those parts of pipelines that could be dangerous;
 
+  The written scheme must specify the nature and frequency of examinations, and include any special measures that may be needed to prepare a system for a safe examination.

Remember, a statutory examination carried out in line with a written scheme is designed to ensure your pressure system is suitable for your intended use. It is not a substitute for regular and routine maintenance.

And finally...

+  Ensure that pressure equipment complies with the relevant regulations;

+  Before using pressure equipment, ensure that you have a written scheme of examination if one is required.

+  Make sure that inspections have been completed by a competent person, and that the results have been recorded;.

+  Always operate the equipment within the safe operating limits;

+  Provide instruction and relevant training for the workers who are going to operate the pressure equipment;

+  Ensure to have an effective maintenance plan in place, which is carried out by appropriately trained people; and

+  Make sure that any modifications are planned, recorded and do not lead to danger.

Simple Steps to Prevent Noise-induced Hearing Loss

Graham Marshall - Saturday, March 16, 2013

Hearing loss due to exposure to industrial noise is the number one disability in the World; which is sad since it is so easily prevented.

Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) occurs when sounds which are greater than 85-decibels (dB) damage the delicate, sensitive structures within the human ear.

Common causes of NIHL result from exposure to noise from chainsaws, hammer-drills, bull-dozers, powered lawn-mowers, motorbikes, diesel trucks, and factory machinery.

The Keys to preventing NIHL include:

+   Remain aware of noise as a hazard and take measures to protect yourself from high noise (above 85 dB);

+   If possible, remove or relocate noisy equipment from the working zone;

+   Limit the period of exposure to noise above 85 dB; and

+   If you must work in a noisy environment, always wear appropriate hearing protective devices, including earplugs, ear-muffs or noise-cancelling head-phones.

 

JSA Training Program Results

Graham Marshall - Wednesday, February 06, 2013

We've recently completed a JSA training program with 100 workers in an oil field belonging to a new customer.

Our new customer required that we collect feedback from their employees and contractors to allow them to evaluate the success of our JSA training program, prior to a wider roll-out of the program in the field.

Enclosed here is a JSA feedback report which shows how the workers thought about the JSA training program and the comments that they made on their feedback forms.

The name and location of the customer has been removed, but otherwise all results and comments are as they were collected.

We'll let you decide if this group of 100-field workers thought our JSA training program is any good!

 


Recent Posts


Tags

UK HSE IFAP BHP Billiton Occupational Overuse Syndrome Construction Safety Nanotechnology Safety Video Crane lifts Unconventional Oil Fatigue Management Thank God it's Friday Marine Safety Manufacturing Nautronix PPE Mining Road Transport Risk Management Toolbox talk Behaviour-based Safety (BBS) Total Natural Hazard OSHA Isolation Control Management of Change Safety Moment Social Responsibility LOTO Risk Assessment Global Harmonized System NORM Driving Safety Best bars in the oil patch OHS Law Risk Tool Box Hydraulic Fracturing ("fracking") Save our Seafarers Campaign Safety "one per-center's" Newfield Supervision Water Corporation Situational Awareness Call Centers Workplace bullying Process Hazard Management Radiation Sources Procedures Working at height Ladder Safety Safety Information Posters Catostrophic Disaster Hierarchy of Safety Control Incident Investigation APPEA US OSHA Safety Culture Survey Unconventional Hydrocarbons Hess Excavations Hazard Spotting Manual handling BP Hazard Awareness Woodside Psycho-social Hazards ALARP Safety PowerPoint Presentation Energy Model of Hazards WorkSafe WA Work in Confined Spaces Hospital Safety NOPSEMA Santos Working with explosives Hazardous Substances Shell Railway Safety CSB Hot work Sakhalin Energy Customer Testimonial Electrical hazards Emergency Response Safe Operating Procedure (SOP) Salute to Our Hero's Raspberry Ketones Scam Drilling Farm safety Safety Alert Pollution prevention Bio-hazards ENI Australia Chevron HSE Leadership Safety Conference Aviation Safety Safe at Home SPE HSE Innovation Award one per center Oil Spill Response Fire Prevention Kellogg Joint Venture Australian OSH Codes of Practice Safety Awards Rosedale Abbey Walking Slips, trips and falls Procedure Training Course Unconventional Gas NOPSA Office Safety WA Resources Safety WMC Resources Job Safety Analysis Coal Seam Gas MSDS Contract Risk Management Safety Management Program Rail Safety Shale Gas Health TK Shipping Kinetic Energy

Archive

Blog / Terms of Use / Site Map / Disclaimer / Risk Management Tool Box 2009. All rights reserved. Web design by Luminosity. E-Commerce by JStores.