The Risk Management Tool Box Blog

Writing Proper Standard Work Procedures

Graham Marshall - Thursday, April 06, 2017

Over the previous eight-years I've  worked on improving Procedures in the United States Oilfield.

In those eight-years I have assisted my US client to use proper Procedures to drive huge Safety, Quality, Delivery and Cost (SQDC) improvements in their business.

For example, we have cut well completions costs from $15 Million in 2008 to under $5 Million in 2017.

We have reduced OSHA recordable incidents from three per month in 2008 to none in 2015 and one in 2016.

We have reduced the spud-to-spud drill rig time from 45-days to 15 days.

Putting together everything I've learned about good Procedures; I have recently delivered two training courses in how to write proper Procedures in Western Australia.

Because of the success of the the first two programs, I have decided to deliver four more programs in July and August 2017.

You can review the coarse objectives below.

The next day-long programs will be delivered on the following dates:

  • Thursday 6th July 2017;
  • Thursday 20th July 2017;
  • Thursday 3rd August 2017;
  • Thursday 17th August 2017; and 
  • Thursday 31st August 2017.

For further details, program costs and to make a booking to attend, simply click this link.

Free Quality Audit for Procedures

Graham Marshall - Monday, March 27, 2017

For a limited time, I'm offering a free service to any Organization that wants a FREE and independent Quality Audit of any written Standard Work Document.

The free service applies to a quality check for Procedures, Guidelines and/or Work Practice type Standard Work.

Details of the offer are shown below!


North Dakota Energy Day 2017

Graham Marshall - Monday, March 27, 2017

North Dakota's Energy Day 2017 took place recently and was a great success.

There is a really great little slideshow from this years North Dakota Energy Day here.


Time in Field Leadership Visits

Graham Marshall - Wednesday, February 08, 2017
7163

Click link for PowerPoint Slideshow

Using Procedures to Reduce Risk in Shale Gas

Graham Marshall - Thursday, January 19, 2017

The anti-shale gas extremists in the UK and elsewhere like to promote the notion that the Shale Gas industry is unregulated and out of control.

In reality, of course, nothing could be further from the truth.

Like all long-term established industries - remember - Shale Gas and Oil has been around since the 1940s; the industry uses a range of standard and accepted techniques to reduce risk to a level as low as reasonably practicable and in line with Government Regulations and community demands.

One area of control that is standard in the Shale Gas sector relates to the use of written Procedures.

Procedures not only show workers how to undertake given tasks in a safe manner; they also help to demonstrate HOW any company is complying with the Health, Safety and Environmental legislation.

Here are just some examples of the massive range of Procedures, Guidelines and Standard Work Practices that are used to manage and minimize risk within the shale gas sector.



2016 SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, September 20, 2016

The 2016 SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition will this year be held on Tuesday 25th - Thursday 27 October 2016 at the Crown Hotel in Perth, Australia.

The conference theme is "Catching the Next Wave – Delivering Affordable Energy" which should be highly topical given the lower-for-longer problems we're currently facing.

For further information about the SPE Conference, click here.

Dr Ronit Kark on Safety Leadership

Graham Marshall - Tuesday, September 20, 2016

A short video on the importance of Safety Leadership.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBDQx7pKbwI&feature=youtu.be

Prices Surge When Frac Company's Come to Town

Graham Marshall - Monday, September 07, 2015

The Real Story of Home Prices & Frac

Anti-frac activists make many claims about the harmful consequences of Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation ("frac").

One of the most oft-heard claims is used to scare home-owners that the value of their real estate will fall if frac is allowed to go ahead in their locality.

But is that claim true?

Evidence from the Bakken shale play in North Dakota paints an entirely different picture for home-owners to consider.

In fact, the evidence is unambiguous in demonstrating that when Frac comes to town, the price of real-estate surges; leaving property owners far richer than ever before!

Here are the graphs showing real estate sales and prices in Tioga, Minot, Williston and Watford City for the 5 years from 2009-2014.

Those four towns in Western North Dakota are the centre of the Bakken unconventional oil field, the largest fracking play in America.

And as you can clearly see, home prices surged between $100,000 and almost $200,000 over five years across the four towns in the centre of the Bakken.

Not a bad rate of real estate return in my book!

In fact, the only downside to the Frac boom in ND is that workers who want to move to the State will find it tough to get on the property ladder because the price of real estate has RISEN so much.

It's exactly the opposite problem to what the eco-activists are claiming! How wrong can they be?


Details Matter in Safety Procedures

Graham Marshall - Monday, March 02, 2015

This month's Process Safety Beacon highlights how the details matter when it comes to writing Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).

One tip that I always use whenever I'm writing a Safety Procedure is to include numbers in both text and numeric format.

So, for example, forty-five feet (45') is written like that!

"Pressure-test the system to a maximum of five-thousand psi (5,000 psi)" is another example of this process to be used when writing SOPs.

The reason I do this with numbers is that it is so easy to miss a single zero (0) off a written number, and five-thousand (5,000) of something, suddenly becomes five-hundred (500) in the written SOP.

It may not matter, but often, there is a very big difference in a unit that is ten-times (10x) bigger or smaller than it is meant to be!

How to Control Surface Spills on Unconventional Gas Wells

Graham Marshall - Thursday, December 11, 2014

I'm fortunate to work with some very bright people who care passionately about protecting our environment; and at the same time, meet our community energy needs through the exploration and production (E+P) of unconventional hydrocarbons in the form of clean-burning gas.

So it is particularly annoying to have a rat-bag group of NIMBY protesters telling outright lies to the community about our industry's so-called pollution risk to soils, ground water, and health.

I am proud to work in the unconventional energy business - as an Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) specialist - with a very real focus on absolute minimization of risk in our business.

The safety of our people, and the protection of our environment are paramount values amongst the people with whom I work.

Having said all that, one of the common lies told  by opponents of Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation ("frac") is that spills of chemicals on the surface will pollute ground water for thousands of years, and cause untold adverse health problems for local people.

Let me share with you some photographs of the simple, yet effective ways in which we aim for "Zero Loss of Primary Containment" (0 LOPC).

It all starts with the way we construct the drilling location at the start of the Frac process.

As you can see in the picture above, we make a very large non-porous impermeable membrane that covers the whole of the frac-location before work begins.  The impermeable layer is designed to contain any liquid spills and allow time for a Vac-truck to be called to location to suck up the spill before it gets beyond the containment barrier.

Of course, the impermeable barrier is just one of several "layers of protection" that we ensure are being used before the frac begins.  The first layer of protection is to make sure that primary containment of any liquids is always sound.

By primary containment, I mean things like the actual fuel-tanks on generators, or the hoses on engines.  These items of equipment are frequently checked to make sure they are able to contain liquids within the equipment.  But where possible, we used secondary containment (often called "paddling pools" or "duck ponds")  to surround any equipment that contains its own liquid sources (e.g., fuel tanks, light plant, etc).  The paddling pool is the first line of defence if a spill does occur.

So, contrary to the lies of the anti-frac brigade, we make enormous effort to ensure that spills and leaks from primary containment are prevenented.

But a significant part of our risk management efforts is to ensure we have plans in place to ensure that spills which do occur, do not get beyond the secondary containment of the paddling pools or the tertiary containment of the location liner.

Finally, if that fails, we have contingency plans in place which ensure a rapid clean-up is put in place.  This  ensures that all contaminated soil is either treated on location, or removed for treatment at an approved waste facility.

Taken together, the prevention controls and the emergency mitigation and recovery controls I have outlined above mean that there is zero-risk to the earth where we frac; zero risk to the water-table directly below frac locations; and zero risk to community health in the local community in the areas where we work.

Please don't believe the lies of the rat-bags who oppose our drive to create energy-security, cheaper sources of energy, and more high-paying jobs for local people.

There is another side to the story which the Frac-free groups won't tell you.


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